SpaceX Crew-5 Launches to Space Station, Webb & Hubble Team Up, Intense Solar Flare

NASA’s SpaceX Crew-5 Launch

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying the company’s Crew Dragon spacecraft is launched on NASA’s SpaceX Crew-5 mission to the International Space Station with NASA astronauts Nicole Mann and Josh Cassada, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Koichi Wakata, and Roscosmos cosmonaut Anna Kikina onboard, Wednesday, October 5, 2022, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA’s SpaceX Crew-5 mission is the fifth crew rotation mission of the SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft and Falcon 9 rocket to the International Space Station as part of the agency’s Commercial Crew Program. Mann, Cassada, Wakata, and Kikini launched at 12:00 p.m. EDT from Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center to begin a six month mission onboard the orbital outpost. Credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky

Launching a new crew to the space station …

The plan moving forward for Artemis I …

And Webb’s new look at a pair of galaxies … a few of the stories to tell you about – This Week at NASA!


Launching a new crew to the space station, the plan moving forward for Artemis I, and Webb’s new look at a pair of galaxies … a few of the stories to tell you about – This Week at NASA!

NASA’s SpaceX Crew-5 Launches to the Space Station

NASA’s SpaceX Crew-5 mission launched to the International Space Station (ISS) on October 5. Crew-5 will spend six months on the station conducting research and technology demonstrations that benefit people on Earth and lays the groundwork for future Artemis human exploration missions to the Moon and eventually to Mars.

SLS Rocket With Orion Launch Complex 39B

NASA’s Space Launch System rocket will launch with Orion atop it from Launch Complex 39B at NASA’s modernized spaceport at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Credit: NASA

Artemis I Teams Focus on November for Launch Attempt

In the wake of Hurricane Ian, teams at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center are looking at the November 12 through November 27 timeframe for the next Artemis I launch attempt. Artemis I updates are available at blogs.nasa.gov/artemis.

Overlapping Galaxies VV 191

By combining data from NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope and NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, researchers were able to trace light that was emitted by the large white elliptical galaxy at left through the spiral galaxy at right and identify the effects of interstellar dust in the spiral galaxy. This image of galaxy pair VV 191 includes near-infrared light from Webb, and ultraviolet and visible light from Hubble. Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA, Rogier Windhorst (ASU), William Keel (University of Alabama), Stuart Wyithe (University of Melbourne), JWST PEARLS Team, Alyssa Pagan (STScI)

Webb and Hubble Image Features Galaxy Pair

A new Webb Space Telescope image of a spiral galaxy and an elliptical galaxy, combined with a Hubble Space Telescope image, is helping researchers study the effects of interstellar dust and helped them identify a previously unknown lensed galaxy for the first time.

NASA SDO Solar Flare October 2022

NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory captured this image of a solar flare – as seen in the bright flash on the top right – on October 2, 2022. The image shows a subset of extreme ultraviolet light that highlights the extremely hot material in flares and which is colorized in orange. Credit: NASA/SDO

Sun Releases Intense Solar Flare

On October 2, NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory captured the Sun emitting an X1-class solar flare. X-class flares can impact radio communications and electric power grids on Earth and pose risks to spacecraft and astronauts in space.

That’s what’s up this week @NASA

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